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Asteroid belt is remaining of two planets

Laatste wijziging: woensdag 21 september 2011 om 10:25, 1669 keer bekeken Print dit artikel Bekijk alle nieuws feeds van onze site
 
woensdag 21 september 2011

As described in the free online e-book called 'The Bigger Picture', Wholly Science combines the findings of modern science with the profound wisdom of ancient science. By doing so, Wholly Science proves that the asteroid belt used to be two large planets.

The table below show the average distances (in miles) between the core of the central sun in our solar system called Helion and the core of each planet orbiting around Helion. Please note that these core to core distances include both the radius of Helion (which is 432,500 miles) and the radius of the planet. 

Planet

Radius

Distance

Mercury

1,516

36,417,626

Venus

3,761

67,668,621

Terra

3,963

93,393,563

Mars

2,111

142,069,911

When we compare the distances of the consecutive planets, we find the three harmonic ratios (as explained in the book) of the octave (1:2), the quint (2:3), and the quart (3:4), as shown in the table below. 

Planets

Proportion

Ratio

Real

Dev.

Mercury : Venus

1 : 2

0.500

0.538

7,6%

Venus : Terra

3 : 4

0.750

0.725

3,4%

Terra : Mars

2 : 3

0.667

0.657

1,4%

None of these orbits are perfect circles. The planets attract each other, causing deviations from the circle matching the average radius. For a small planet like Mercury, this deviation is sometimes more than 20%, while for a giant like Jupiter the maximum deviation is no more than 5%. These attractions explain the deviances (Dev.) of the real ratios from the harmonic ratios. 

Planet

Radius

Distance

Jupiter

44,423

484,108,923

Saturn

37,449

888,657,949

Uranus

15,882

1,784,398,382

Neptune

15,389

2,799,289,889

Pluto

743

3,670,485,313

The four planets discussed so far are the closest to Helion. These are the so-called inner planets. Next we find a region that is generally referred to as the asteroid belt. Beyond the asteroid belt, we find the outer planets, as shown in the table above. Again, all real ratios match are very close to the prefect harmonic values. 

Planets

Proportion

Ratio

Real

Dev.

Jupiter : Saturn

1 : 2

0.500

0,545

9,0%

Saturn : Uranus

3 : 4

0.500

0,498

0,4%

Uranus : Neptune

2 : 3

0.667

0,637

4,4%

Neptune : Pluto

3 : 4

0.750

0,763

1,7%

The rather high deviation for the proportion of Jupiter and Saturn is caused by the absence of two inner planets pulling Jupiter closer to Helion. We only find a small part of the remainings of these planets in the asteroid belt. This belt stretches out from about 180 million miles from Helios to a distance of 360 million miles. The table below shows that within the space between mars and Jupiter there is exactly room for two planets. Further more, ancient writings reveal the names of both planets, which are Tiamat and Marduk. Within the asteroid belt, also a so-called dwarf planet orbits Helios. The name of this small celestial body is Ceres, and it most likely used to be a moon of Tiamat or Marduk. 

Planet

Distance

Mars

142

Tiamat

213

Marduk

321

Jupiter

484

The table above shows the average core to Helion's core distance in million miles of the two former planets and their neighbors.  

Planets

Proportion

Ratio

Real

Dev.

Mars : Tiamat

2 : 3

0.667

0,666

0,2%

Tiamat : Marduk

2 : 3

0.667

0,664

0,4%

Marduk : Jupiter

2 : 3

0.667

0,664

0,4%

The three ratios of these four consecutive planets all nearly perfectly match the harmonic proportion of 2:3.  

Wholly science combines the findings from modern science (which are the distances and the radiuses) with the insights from ancient science (in harmonics). By doing so, we are able to reconstruct the asteroids between Mars and Jupiter into two planets. Together with the nine planets that currently still orbit around Helion this makes a total of eleven planets. According to the translation of Zecharia Sitchin (1920-2010), the cuneiform writings on clay tablets of Sumeria mention a twelfth planet called Nibiru, meaning 'planet of the crossing'. It is said that Nibiru's orbit is nearly perpendicular to the plane of the ecliptic, and that it crosses this plane between Mars and Jupiter. Sitchin believed that Nibiru or one of its satellites clashed with Tiamat. Probably the same happened with Marduk. Other names referring to the same celestial body are Nemesis, Hercolubus, Wormwood, or simply Planet X (X meaning 'unknown').  

The free online e-book discusses Nibiru and also 'Elenin' in more detail. Click here for more information about this book.  

The Netherlands (Zeist) 
September 19th, 2011  

Johan Oldenkamp



Bron: pateo.nl

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