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Aliens would be interested in our music and art, scientists say

Laatste wijziging: zondag 22 augustus 2010 om 14:27, 3217 keer bekeken Print dit artikel Bekijk alle nieuws feeds van onze site
 
zondag 22 augustus 2010

One would think that if an alien race were to contact us, they would want to talk about Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity or Stephen Hawking’s idea of quantum gravity. Not so, says a panel of scientists who recently met to discuss the search for extraterrestrial life. These experts say that any space travelers would be so far ahead of us in technology that our musings would be of little interest to them. Instead, as Space.com reports, aliens would be much more interested in our art and music.

Why? Because our art and music is “singularly human” and would likely express our experience on Earth better than anything. And these aliens would probably be so different from us that it would maintain their interest. Douglas Vakoch is the director of interstellar message composition at the SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Institute in Mountain View, Calif. As he told Space.com, "If they're so advanced, we probably can't teach them about science, but we can tell them what it's like to be at this precarious point where we don't know if we're going to continue as a species."

 
Experts have long thought that patterns of mathematics might present the most universal way of communicating. Music, based in mathematics, might particularly peak their interest. Experts say Bach, Vivaldi, and other Baroque composers would be most appealing because they are “fairly regular and harmonic.” As for visual arts, some say Pre-Raphaelite paintings might work best. As comic book artist Paul Duffield told Space.com, "The richly three-dimensional, almost photographic representation [of Pre-Raphaelite paintings] could be more easily interpretable. And it's very expressive."
 
Not all experts agree that alien contact would be so pleasant. Astrophysicist Hawking has famously pointed out that alien contact would be too risky. According to Hawking, aliens landing on Earth would be like Christopher Columbus arriving in the Americas — a meeting that went horribly wrong for Native Americans.

Bron: www.mnn.com

 If Aliens Exist, They Will Probably Love Bach

SANTA CLARA, Calif. – If we ever make contact with aliens, they might be more interested in learning about Van Gogh and Bach than Einstein or Newton, scientists said Saturday.

Art may attract aliens more than academics because any extraterrestrial civilization that we are able to get in touch with is likely to be much older than us and more technically advanced, researchers said here at the SETIcon conference on the search for extraterrestrial intelligence.

Humans would probably have little to teach them about science and mathematics that they don't already know, the theory suggests. However, our art and music is singularly human, and could likely be fascinating to an alien species.

"What would the other guys want to know about us? What in the world do we have to offer?" asked Douglas Vakoch, director of interstellar message composition at the SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Institute in Mountain View, Calif. "If they're so advanced, we probably can't teach them about science, but we can tell them what it's like to be at this precarious point where we don't know if we're going to continue as a species."

Advanced alien civilizations will probably have overcome the issues that threaten adolescent species like our own, such as how to live sustainably without degrading the planet, and how not to destroy ourselves with biological or technical warfare, Vakoch said. Advanced extraterrestrials might even have forgotten what it's like to live as we do, with the future in question. And the best way to teach them about what it's like to be human may be through art and music, Vakoch added.

However, aliens are likely to be so different from us that it will be difficult for them to understand our art.

We may do best to present works based on the language and patterns of mathematics, which might be more universal, Vakoch said.

Pierre Schwob, author and creator of the classical music repository ClassicalArchives.com, suggested that a piece like Bach's "Goldberg Variations," which is built on mathematical patterns, might be particularly accessible to extraterrestrials.

"If anything I would think, yes, any civilization whatsoever would gather that this is extraordinarily beautiful," Schwob said. "But we really don't have any idea what would be appreciated by an alien civilization." [10 Alien Encounters Debunked]

He said other works by Bach, Vivaldi, and other Baroque composers could be a good bet because they are fairly regular and harmonic.

"What about Lady Gaga?" a member of the audience asked, referring to the American pop singer.

"I won't even go there," Schwob replied.

As for visual art, comic book artist Paul Duffield suggested showing extraterrestrials examples of Pre-Raphaelite paintings.

"The richly three-dimensional, almost photographic representation could be more easily interpretable," he said. "And it's very expressive."

Likewise, learning about how aliens create art could be one of the most interesting aspects of making contact.

"If we could ask only one question, I think maybe not 'Do you have religion?' but, 'Do you have music?'" would be best, said SETI senior astronomer Seth Shostak.

SETIcon is being held this year to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first modern experiment aimed to search for intelligent life beyond Earth, called Project Ozma.

- Ten Alien Encounters Debunked

- Video — Listening for Life

- 50 Years of Listening for Aliens: Q & A With SETI Pioneer Jill Tarter

Bron: www.space.com

 



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